Slide Show: Kurt Vonnegut’s Whimsical Drawings : The New Yorker

What’s Wrong With Sentimentality?

See on Scoop.it - Readin’ ‘n’ Writin’

A conversation with Leslie Jamison, author of The Empathy Exams

Rick Powell's insight:

Well, part of what she says is right and part of what says is wrong. Short Term 12 is manipulative because the kids are ciphers. The change happens within and to the caregivers while the kids are the catalysts. They’re interchangeable. Their particulars don’t matter. All that matters is that they’re fucked up. So Jamison isn’t being particularly emotionally intelligent in this case. Short Term 12 isn’t troublesome because it wants us to feel for the caregivers, the adults.  They deserve some sympathy, too. It’s troublesome because of the things it doesn’t want us to think about. The problem isn’t sentimentality. The problem is dishonesty.


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R u talkin to me? - Babycakes Romero
Deith #streetart

Deith #streetart

covery44:

derriuspierre:

LaQuan Smith “Dark Summer” Spring/Summer 2014 Collection

Hot
A+

A+

oh that lower abdomen.

oh that lower abdomen.

now here’s an idea…

ryanpanos:

Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via

For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.

Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.

“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”

now here’s an idea…

ryanpanos:

Boondock | Andrew Waits | Via

For most people, the American Dream doesn’t include living in a van on public land in the middle of nowhere. For others, though, that is the very definition of freedom–a life defined by exploration and adventure, free from the rat race of modern life.

Photographer Andrew Waits spent two years roaming the beaches, forests and deserts of California, Nevada, Arizona and his home state of Washington documenting boondockers, the broadly defined group of people living almost entirely off the grid and on the road. Boondock is a collection of intimate portraits of the men, women and families he met on the road. Some lead the migrant life by choice, others by circumstance. But whatever their reasons, they share a common theme.

“What I boil it down to is this will to survive,” Waits says. “I found that was really the one tie that brought everyone together. If it was something that they needed to do because they were unhappy, they made that decision to change their life to hopefully find happiness–essentially that’s a decision to survive. Losing your job and needing to live out of your van, that is a decision to survive.”

Awww.

Awww.

printwhisperer:

I mean damn………

printwhisperer:

I mean damn………

printwhisperer:

I mean damn………